Saturday, February 28, 2009

Another Blast from the Past























Some times the composite does not look similar to the suspect. This is one I did for a County Detective.   Fortunately there are other features that make the suspect unique.  The suspect's arrest cleared 6 robberies.  

So the moral is, if you're going to commit a crime, stick with the traditional hairstyles. 

17 comments:

Gail H. Ragsdale said...

There has to be a lot of satisfaction in this! This is a skill not many people possess (I don't).

James Parker said...

The artwork did it for sure. Done in by the "Do". Another moral "don't commit the crime, and wear your hair as you please.

artbyakiko said...

Thanks to your composite. Another case solved! I think he easily qualifies to be one of Jay Leno's "stupid criminals." lol

pencilportraits said...

Sheila, I can only imagine how exciting your job must have been, your art caught criminals, wow!!!

Kim VanDerhoek said...

Too funny!

How was his unique hair described to you? It must have been difficult to translate into a picture. You did a great job though, because he got caught using the sketch.

dominique eichi said...

Great going Sheila, that is so funny. Caught by hairdo !

Mona said...

Sheila,

Great job on a very interesting case. I have the same question as Kim. Having been a victim myself, I know how hard it is to remember details, let alone describe them.

Sheila said...

Kim and Mona. It really is a cooperative job. Witnesses/victims use everything from verbal descriptions, facial expressions, gestures and even drawing to help describe something unique like this. I keep changing the image until he/she is satisfied. Thanks for the question!

Cynthia said...

My oh my...why didn't he think of that hair issue himself? What a 'do...you really 'capture' him Sheila! Excellent <3

Stephen Dell'Aria said...

Interesting Sheila. I actually find some similarities in the face too. I know nothing about how these composite sketches work but it occurred to me that if a face was let's say digitally composed from photographic facial elements (eyes, nose, mouth, etc.) it could be very misleading, considering how we take photos to be a truthful representation, whereas the sketch leaves some latitude for interpretation making them more accurate and less misleading. Hmmmm....a sketch can be more accurate then a photo in this instance.

Manon Doyle said...

Good job Sheila! I'm with the others..... I can't even imagine how interesting your job was..... so much satisfaction!

Nancy and the fatties said...

Hi Miss Sheila, your work still makes a difference in keeping people safe! that is really amzing and you are so talented. You are like The Closer! : ) very cool.
thanks for stopping by the bloggy! I am so excited about the new space, I have to tell you it took me years to get it, but it ended up being because of someone I met in a workshop! I guess it pays to network!
many hugs...

r garriott said...

Reminds me of a robber here that was caught running away from the scene of the crime-- he was easy to follow because he had on those athletic shoes that have the blinking lights on the back. Guess in a life of crime, it does not pay to be fashionable.

Always great to see your work, Sheila.

Sheila E. said...

oh my goodness, I see alot of similarities of your drawing and the suspect. Your drawing skill are amazing.

Madd Sketch said...

lol that is hilarious! That would be embarrassing to talk about in prison lol.

Rebecca said...

wow, interesting post, and what a wild job you had.

Chris Beck said...

Always enjoy your blog! As a former cop, you'll love this: my brother once bought a car that had been used as the getaway car in a bank robbery. Great choice on the part of the thief -- bright red 280Z with personalized license plates featuring the guy's own name!! Some people just don't see the big picture!!