Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Cold Wax Experiment

There is not much I could find on the web about using cold wax as a medium. I know it can be used as a matte finish for paintings instead of varnish.

So you know me, I just went for it. I like the way it feels and keeps the strokes but I still don't think I am using it the way I'm supposed to. Maybe I am supposed to add a medium to it but I didn't want to thin it down at all.

Any suggestions would be welcome!



6x8 oil/cold wax on RayMar

28 comments:

Kim VanDerhoek said...

Wish I could help but I have no idea how to use cold wax. The vibrant colors and diagonal lines in this painting make it very exciting to look at! Great job!

Edward Burton said...

Cool experiment, Sheila!

Manon Doyle said...

Can't help either Sheila but I really love what you've done here. I agree with Kim!

The Bull said...

I agree with Lilly, experimentation can lead to some wonderful discoveries! Have fun with it!

suzanneberry said...

i have no idea how to use cold wax, but apparently you do. this is amazing! i thought it was a photograph. bravo!

Chuck Dilmore said...

yeah...
you definitely have something here!

love the choices you made.
it looks like you were born for this very experiment!

peace~

Angela Elledge said...

You are so brave to try something new. I learn so much from you!

James Oh said...

I just can tell you that it is very lively and I do love it. A great piece.

Unseen Rajasthan said...

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Stephen Dell'Aria said...

I've never done an encaustic (hot wax) painting before but it is an ancient medium. As far as cold wax is concerned I read you can add some linseed oil to thin it and egg yolks to improved adhesion to the surface. If you'd like a contemporary example of encaustic painting you can look at some of Jasper Johns' paintings from the fifties. He used it to mimic and parody the thick gestural painting strokes of the abstract expressionist painters that dominated painting back then.

Carol Schiff Studio said...

Sheila, I have never heard of using cold wax. How did you use it? The painting is killer, I hope you will experiment more along these lines. Abstract may be your thing!

Gary Keimig said...

I know nothing about what you are doing but -Go For It-
I have to ask Sheila Where do you find the time to do all you do? You are incredible and doing some very nice things.

Abby Creek Art said...

Hey nice job! I'm wanting to experiment with wax too...I've not heard about using cold wax though. Keep it going and see what happens!

laurens.paint.palette said...

I am not sure!! But this looks great and really I think that half of the fun of painting is getting new supplies and then learning how to use them!

Michelle said...

Ooh how fun! I've never tried it, but you've got me intrigued! Is it Gamblin's cold wax medium?

Kathleen said...

Sheila I thought I was very much "in the Know" regarding art techniques and supplies but I have never heard of cold wax or raymar -(is it like mylar?) I am quite impressed with your work and your bold approach to all -

Maryanne said...

Hi Sheila
I have used Dorlands cold wax, by adding a bit to other medium and oil paint. It makes the paint thicker (you can use a palette knife to apply it) and more matte.

I think that someone like Wayne Thiebaud could use cold wax (his paint is very thick, but the color is beautiful).

Benny Alba said...

I have used Dorlands cold wax, by adding a bit to other medium and oil paint. It makes the paint thicker (you can use a palette knife to apply it) and more matte.

The above info by Stephan is the correct one to my knowledge. Some of the fun of using wax such as Dorlands is the finish that you can get heating the final surface. Be aware that some hairdriers may cause fires... Polishing sometimes, such as with cheezecloth, can give an interesting matt surface too. Amazingly enough, ancient Etruscan paintings of encaustic/was remain in good shape! Squeak C., whose work is at the Oakland Museum right now uses it. Perhaps a field trip very soon to do? BA

Benny Alba said...

MaryAnne was the one I intended to quote. Sorry.

Gwen Bell said...

Fantastic texture! Very cool. I've never heard of cold wax, but the effect you achieved here is really nice.

theresamillerwatercolors said...

Bold and rich colors, love it! I had never heard of this medium before... I have a lot to learn from you!

Lindsay said...

Thanks for your nice comment and would you mind sending me the link for your colision and foresnic work?
I'd really appreciate it!Thansks

Anne Marie Propst said...

Very interesting.

NicholeCamarillo.com said...

I've never used cold wax before. That's crazy, I would LOVE to try it. It looks great. So much texture and depth. I love the colors you're working with as well! Awesome, Sheila.

Carrie Jacobson said...

Cool! Abstract! Love the wax. I have read that wood surfaces are best for wax/encaustic - I think you've done a fine job here. It's great that you're experimenting. Isn't it liberating to make abstracts?

Jala Pfaff said...

I tried it a few month ago for the first time. As I understand it, you're just supposed to use up to 1/3 of it, proportionally, in your oil paint without adding anything else. In my own painting, I'm not sure I felt like it really "did" anything. But I only tried it that once.

Marissa Girard said...

I use cold wax in all of my paintings, and have done a lot of investigation into using it archivally. the two big brands are Gamblin and Dorland's, I personally prefer Gamblin's because it contains only Beeswax and OMS. If there is a problem with my work down the road, I'm not trying to deal with the multitude of ingredients that Dorland's uses (4 different waxes, damar resin, and OMS). If you are painting on a rigid surface ( like board), which I suggest with the use of wax, use 1/2 paint, 3/8 wax and 1/8 alkyd medium (like Gamblin's Galkyd or Galkyd Lite). If you are using a flexible support (canvas), which isn't recommended because it expands and contracts, I'd go with 1/2 paint, 1/4 wax and 1/4 Alkyd. The addition of the alkyd adds flexibility and "stickiness" to the paint, preventing flaking and cracking in the future. Cold wax is an amazing alternative to encaustic, as it adds such an amazing tooth to the surface of the work, and it requires a great deal of spontaneity.

Anonymous said...

Very nice painting!

A few months ago I attended a one day workshop with Rebecca Crowell. She introduced the use of oil and wax in abastract painting. I love working with this technique and Rebecca's work. For more information go to:

oilandwax.ning.com
or
www.rebeccacrowell.com

S. Anderson